Nori Supplier Profile

Wausa Farm

Location

Location

NE, USA

Methodologies

Methodologies

Croplands v1.4

Read our methodologies

Tonnes issued

Tonnes issued

227.5

Regenerative Tonnes

Tonnes sold

Tonnes sold

0.0

Regenerative Tonnes

About

This quarter section of farmland first came into the Lindahl family in the 1930s. It remained in the Lindahl family until 1964 when my father died, and my mother sold it to another family. In 2017, the land became available for purchase which we did. In 1933, my grandfather, Robert Lindahl, purchased the SE1/4 of Section 23, Township 29 N, Range 2 W, Knox County, Nebraska (160 acres) on a voluntary foreclosure by the previous owner’s lender. My grandfather offered what he considered to be low bid for the quarter section of farmland, but it was accepted, and my grandfather became the owner of the farm. As he was already farming and residing on another farm, he moved his daughter, her husband, and children, onto this farm. They continued to live there until the mid-1940s when they purchased another farm. My parents then moved onto the farm and continued to reside and farm the quarter section until my father’s death in 1963. During that time, I grew up on that farm helping, as I was able, my father with the farming operation. After my father’s death, my mother sold the land to the Cunningham family. After the death of the Cunninghams, their children offered the land for sale in November of 2017, and we became the owners of the land. It was again in the Lindahl family. Until 2011, the farm had been farmed in the traditional method of plowing, discing, harrowing, planting, cultivating, and then harvesting. In 2011, the Cunninghams gave up their farming activities and leased the land to Roger Blunck. Roger suggested to the Cunninghams that they consider “no-till” farming. The Cunninghams agreed. The farm has been farmed continuously since that year by Roger, and his son, Matt, utilizing “no-till.” Upon our purchase of the land, we leased the land to Roger and Matt, and they have continued the “no-till” practice on the farm. Since 2020, we have added cover crops to the land. We are considering incorporating a small grain crop into the traditional corn soybean rotation. The advantage of “no-till” is in the utilization of the decomposition of the previous year’s crop residue into the soil increasing the health of the soil. Healthy soil increases the activity of earthworms in the soil helping with moisture retention in the soil. Also, the residue, and the additional crop cover, help with soil erosion during periods of heavy rainfall. For so long as we own this farm, we will continue with the “no-till” farming operation to promote the health of the soil and to assist in the annual crop production. We wish to be good stewards of the land and pass it on to the next generation in a better condition than when my grandfather purchased it back in 1933.

Details

Owner

Loren Lindahl

Crops

Corn, Soybeans, Small grains

Practices

No-till

Timeline

Began in 2011

Fields

East

Regenerative Tonnes issued

129.1

Regenerative Tonnes sold

0.0

Vintages

2019 - 2022

West

Regenerative Tonnes issued

98.4

Regenerative Tonnes sold

0.0

Vintages

2019 - 2022

Verification Reports

DateDescription

May 24, 2023

Verification Report completedView Report

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